Was taking the daily look at the Barn Owl nestcam site – nobody home. Not surprising now, so I got this from the diary …

July 2009
24th – all three young owls were seen on the tray on Monday night. This will become an increasingly rare sight. The eldest owlet is eleven weeks old today, and as dispersal typically takes place at between ten and fourteen weeks, his time at the nest site is drawing to a close. He will be becoming less reliant on the adult birds for food, and he may well have captured his first prey item on his own by now. In Britain young Barn Owls will often disperse twelve kilometres or more from the nest site to find a home range of their own. Once he flies the nest we are unlikely to see him again unless we are lucky enough to find him at his own nest site sometime in the future.

I do hope they all do well, and that the parents use the nest box again next year. It’s an excellent site and it’s been fascinating watching the whole process from the owls first “build”, well settle, owls don’t do nests like other birds :-), through to now when it seems all 3 chicks have made it thus far. Things will be tough for them over the winter and it’s likely not all will amke it thoguth to spring … but …

We need far more sites like this, not necessarily with cameras, but places for the owls to breed. They’re called barn owls because they nested and lived in barns. With industrial farming the barns are no longer there for them or are so heavily used all year the owls can’t nest there. If you’d like to have a box get in touch with the Trust and get yourself a nest box. The trust will help you site it and suggest the best places, talk about habitat and food natural supplies for the owls. It’s a wonderful thing to do.