Caledonian Everyday Discussions Pt 1 of 4

Elen Sentier:

This sounds really interesting …

Originally posted on ecoartscotland:

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As part of Sylva Caledonia, one of Summerhall’s contributions to Edinburgh International Science Festival, we are holding a discussion, Caledonian Everyday in four parts.  The first part will take place on Sunday 12 April at 2pm at Summerhall (Anatomy Lecture Theatre).

We are very pleased that Paul Tabbush, Chair of the Landscape Research Group (Bio), will join the exhibiting artists to discuss key questions imagining the future of forests in Scotland.

The key questions are:

  • Who knows what (and who decides) about the ancient woodlands of Scotland?
    Management of forests is no longer restricted to issues of extraction vs biodiversity. In a field including wild and free forest (no management), community management and extraction, and a science-based biodiversity management system, what are the various implications? Who decides? Who benefits? Who speaks for the forest and other living things?
    .
  • What can the arts and humanities…

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Nectan’s Kieve & Moon Song

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If you’re thinking of reading my novel Moon Song you may well like to visit Nectan’s Kieve, between Boscastle and Tintagel. It’s where a lot of the story is set :-). My dad used to live just across from there … Continue reading

John Muir Trust backs reintroduction of beaver – and lynx | Walkhighlands

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This is such good news! I hope they succeed (perhaps a bit later) with the reintroduction of wolves. The rewilding of Britain will do so much good in so many ways, from seriously helping with the rebalance of species, through … Continue reading

UK days out with myths and legends

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Good article from The Guardian. We need to bring ourselves back to our old stories and connect them with our land … Magic mountain – Cadair Idris, Snowdonia, Gwynedd (OS Explorer OL23) The joy of the 893-metre Cadair Idris is … Continue reading